Tag Archive for yarn

‘Chunky Knits’ by Anna Mo Incorporate Enormous Stitches to Comfortably Engulf the Body (9 pics)

Anna Mo ‘s chunky knits are not shy about their pattern, the soft form of her objects forcing the wearer to observe the pieces in all of their magnified glory. To knit these mammoth material works the Ukraine-based Mo not only uses extremely thick sections of wool, but also XXL needles to produce her three-inch-thick stitches. In addition to her wearable works, Mo also sells the yarn that she uses to produce the pieces (100% Australian merino wool) as well as oversized knitting needles so you can produce your own chunky sweaters and blankets.)

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‘Chunky Knits’ by Anna Mo Incorporate Enormous Stitches to Comfortably Engulf the Body (9 pics)

Fragile Crocheted Leaf Sculptures by Susanna Bauer (14 pics)

Adornment Vl. 29 H x 21 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn. All photos courtesy art-photographers.co.uk. Working with the rigid edges of large dried magnolia leaves artist Susanna Bauer ( previously ) adds tiny crocheted embellishments of cotton yarn to create fascinating sculptures that marry the natural and artificial world.

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Fragile Crocheted Leaf Sculptures by Susanna Bauer (14 pics)

Upholstered Faux Taxidermy Heads and Animals by Kelly Rene Jelinek (9 pics)

Artist Kelly Rene Jelinek fabricates life-sized replicas of taxidermied animal heads using fragments of upholstery fabric. The decorative objects conjure nostalgia from Jelinek’s youth spent in rural Wisconsin where she frequently encountered taxidermy deer and game mounts as part of everyday household decor. The artist begins with the same foam mounts utilized by actual taxidermists to which she applies shreds of fabric, yarn, resin (or found) antlers, and glass marble eyes. The results are surprisingly modern sculptural objects that mimic traditional anatomical mounts. Jelinek sells many of her original works on Etsy and you can also follo her on Instagram . (via The Awesomer , Hi-Fructose )

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Upholstered Faux Taxidermy Heads and Animals by Kelly Rene Jelinek (9 pics)

A Photographic Celebration of America’s Vibrant Textile Industry by Christopher Payne (11 pics)

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts Typically focusing on obsolete or decrepit architectural structures, photographer  Chris Payne 's most recent project, Textiles , documents the aesthetics of the colorfully-hued American textile industry. His photographs showcase the bright runs of yarn and thread as the materials makes their way through the hyper-organized machinery, appearing digitally altered in their extreme hot pinks, vibrant reds, and electric blues. Payne began photographing the factories and mills in America’s Northeast in 2010. The images are not just snapshots of the industry, but photographs that sometimes took months to catch. Due to the machinery’s continuous run and his inability to halt production, Payne had to wait until the perfect moment when the right color would appear, or the parts of the machinery would perfectly align. Payne also features the workers within his documentation of the diminishing domestic industry, explaining that their inclusion is proof that labor and craftsmanship is still valued in our current economy. “Over the past five years, I have gained access to an industry that continues to thrive, albeit on a much smaller scale, and for the most part, out of public view,” said Payne . “Many mills are doing quite well, having modernized to stay competitive, while others have survived by catering to niche markets that value the ‘genuine article’ produced on the original, vintage equipment. I view my work as a celebration of American manufacturing—not a eulogy. Trained as an architect, Payne typically shoots architectural structures using large format documentation to capture America’s industrial landscape. Past projects have included exploring America’s asylums and an uninhabited island named North Brother Island in New York City’s East River. Payne’s Asylum series will appear at Benrubi Gallery February 11, 2016 and run through March 26, 2016. (via Huffington Post )

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A Photographic Celebration of America’s Vibrant Textile Industry by Christopher Payne (11 pics)